Taken on the 11th and don't think this will go away. 33 this morning with clear sky.

12/4/12

River Barge Traffic On The Not So Mighty Miss

They say by the 10th of this month levels will be too low between St. Louis and Cairo (pronounced KA-RO) for barge traffic. The dynamics of this are massive in what is shipped and what the results will be if they can't be.

ST. LOUIS, MO (KPLR) – This week’s edition of The Pulse of St. Louis takes a closer look at the dangerously low water levels on the Mississippi River. If water levels continue to drop, due to record setting drought, barges that transport coal, steel, corn, grain, and other products could come to a halt. 

This is actually a very good piece and includes four different discussion videos. The Coast Guard fellow isn't very good but it's the others you learn from. I put the last short video up because it's the Army Corps of Engineers spokesman who tells it like it really is. In that they expect there not to be enough moisture anytime soon and possibly including next year as well.

Seems real certain barge traffic will cease very soon on this stretch of the Mississippi. The only thing mighty about this is just how negative it is.

13 comments:

  1. This drought is serious! and no end in sight. Yesterday in Kansas, 70 degrees...for sure not the December norm. Global warming is a fact and should not be shoved under the table... BTW, the table will be one of the first places we feel the effects of this drought.

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    1. http://www.agrinews-pubs.com/articles/news/latest-news/default.asp?Article=CCABDE276688848A2EB96C3000196D5B35137C76D7B8734B

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  2. Exactly TMoon. This is not going to be good at all. Where there is no vegetation here the soil is powder.

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  3. hey tom, its graham. who did you know at teton pines in Jackson?

    As for global warming, IT SUCKS!! especially since I love to ski.

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  4. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-11-27/drought-parched-mississippi-river-is-halting-barges.html

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  5. We don't know if we are going to be able to farm...very frightening...very.

    A food supply and a water supply is a must now...just to be on the safe side.

    Linda
    http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com
    http://deltacountyhistoricalsociety.wordpress.com

    ¸.•*¨*•♪♫♫♪Merry Christmas to you ♪♫•*¨*•.¸¸♥
    ˜”*°•.˜”*°•.˜”*°•.★★.•°*”˜.•°*”˜.•°*”˜”

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  6. At one of the links you sent RZ they said water from reservoirs was being released into the Missouri. From the place I linked to they said they weren't sure they wanted to do that. Why - because they're afraid it won't get replenished.

    Another thing is it take 10-14 days for water that is released in the Dakota's to reach St. Louis.

    Not enough get it yet Linda. This is a now and has been a game changer.

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  7. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0LQgRd7O4E

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  8. It's probably inevitable this will happen.

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  9. OF,

    Was in the corn field for 3 days before turkey day and the W Des Moines was lower than mom has ever seen it.

    Kansas is drier than a bone, the lakes, reservoirs, creeks, and rivers, are lower than I've seen in 40 years.

    The CORPs and NOAA Drought sites don't hold out much hope nor does the Farmers Almanac.

    Tim in KC

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    1. Again the reason the Corps doesn't want to release water into the Missouri is because they don't think they'll be able to get it back. This is so serious.
      Thanks Tim!!

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  10. I'm hoping this drought doesn't last as long as the Dust Bowl drought did. From the Wikipedia article, it looks like it lasted a decade. Weather can stay like that for a while, even without extra greenhouse gases.

    Meant to write yesterday that I love the picture of the tracks, One Fly.

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  11. This is the 15th year of it here Cujo. Where there is no vegetation of any kind the soil is like dust and that is not an over statement.

    Sent you that picture.

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