4/16/17
This is Bistek al la Mexicana a common dish found many places. There are several places I get this some better than others but all real decent! Kind of a tomato based sauce with generally pretty tender pieces of beef and a fair amount of it. The rice is pretty generic but the frijoles can be something else. This also includes as many fresh made in front of you tortillas you want and brought to you with a smile. Something like this costs around 50-60 pesos or $3. The squeezed as you watch orange juice is 20 and brings the price up a bit but worth it. Nothing in the States I've ever had compares to this not even close plus it'll cost 7-10 smacks. I don't know what I'm going to eat when I return. It will be an adjustment as I do this so much that is go into Puerto Vallarta on the south side and have me a excellent lunch with "real" Mexican food not the slop I get back there. I do not plan on eating out much at all only at maybe three select places. Pricey yes but worth it because it's so good. I threw away so much money last summer eating way overpriced shitty food. Several times the food got thrown away as well. The whole of Mexico is an eating machine I tell you. I'm gonna miss this.

I feel good and and think the higher temps and humidity contributes to that. It's the same every time. After a month or two you realize and say " Hey I feel pretty damn good!"

Just as important I believe the food made fresh with wholesome fresh ingredients as well contributes to that. Get off the bus in town the food smells everywhere make me hungry just like that.

2/12/09

Community Owned Wind Farms

UPDATE 2/13
David Tidball left this comment with two excellent links.

It is possible that you have not heard of the community wind movement in the United States. Anyone interested should check out our website at www.windustry.org. Though the mechanisms here in the USA are somewhat different than the UK, Windustry has been working on community-friendly wind energy for nearly ten years. Further information on a broader range of community friendly economic policies could also be found on the website of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance at www.ilsr.org.

This article out of the UK tells how communities have formed co-ops with alternative financing that allows them to own their own wind farms that actually returns a fair amount on the investment.

Our country needs alternatives such as this as there are many like myself who would welcome the opportunity to participate in projects that make us less oil dependent. It's the direction we must go. The other choices are losers.

In the East Midlands, a co-operative group has become the first owners of a community wind farm. This venture is part of an initiative that the government hopes will be replicated across the country and provide an effective and sustainable new form of financing for cash-strapped wind farm projects.

2 comments:

  1. It is possible that you have not heard of the community wind movement in the United States. Anyone interested should check out our website at www.windustry.org. Though the mechanisms here in the USA are somewhat different than the UK, Windustry has been working on community-friendly wind energy for nearly ten years. Further information on a broader range of community friendly economic policies could also be found on the website of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance at www.ilsr.org.

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  2. Thanks for stopping by David and leaving these links!! Put your comment at the top of this post. One Fly

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